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July 7 to July 14, 2011

In This Issue

News:

Global, national, and local news, plus our new Voices section

This week:

Lloyd Center Clambake XXVI

Museum Institute for Teaching Science Workshop

More

Save The Date:

Capturing the Herbal Harvest

Saturday Supper - Agriculture and Seaweed

More

Announcements:

BPI Certification Courses this August

Sustainable "Center Cafe" Opens in South End "ecoNewBedford" District

Weekly Green Tip:

Sunscreen - protection or poison?

Clip of the Week

bike lanes
a little movie about a ticket i got for riding my bike not in the bike lane
Movie!

Weekly Quote:

"The bicycle is the most efficient machine ever created: Converting calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of three thousand miles per gallon."
- Bill Strickland, The Quotable Cyclist

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Leaf Bullet News
Global
Sugar Palm Energy A Rain Forest Advocate Taps the Energy of the Sugar Palm
One of Indonesia's most ardent rain forest protection activists is in what may seem an unlikely position: Spearheading a project to produce biofuel from trees.

But tropical forest scientist Willie Smits, ­­after 30 years studying fragile ecosystems in these Southeast Asian islands, wants to draw world attention to a powerhouse of a tree-the Arenga sugar palm. Smits says it can be tapped for energy and safeguard the environment while enhancing local food security. Read more here.

Urban Fish Farming Urban Fish Farming: Wave Of The Future?
It's a tough time for seafood lovers.

Prefer your fish from the ocean? That habitat is becoming a less hospitable place every day, according to a recent international State of the Oceans report. Water is getting warmer, more acidic. Dead zones are growing. A mass extinction of certain fish and coral species could happen sooner than scientists previously thought. Read more here.

Japanese Nuclear Power Plant What Went Wrong In Fukushima: The Human Factor
Japanese officials are still trying to understand all the factors that contributed to the meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

Officials already have concluded that the plant was not designed to withstand the 40-foot tsunami that hit it on March 11. But it is also likely that workers at the plant could have reduced the severity of the accident if they had made different decisions during the crisis. Read more here.

Arctic Iron Mine Britain's richest man to build giant Arctic iron ore mine
Lakshmi Mittal's 'mega-mine' is believed to be the largest mineral extraction project in the region but threatens unique wildlife
Britain's richest man is planning a giant new opencast mine 300 miles inside the Arctic Circle in a bid to extract a potential $23bn (£14bn) worth of iron ore.

The "mega-mine" - which includes a 150km railway line and two new ports - is believed to be the largest mineral extraction project in the Arctic and highlights the huge commercial potential of the far north as global warming makes industrial development in the region easier. Read more here.

Seaweed Biofuel
Kelp has a high rate of growth and its decay is quite efficient in yielding methane, as well as sugars that can be converted to ethanol. It has been proposed that large open-ocean kelp farms could serve as a source of renewable energy. Unlike some biofuels such as corn ethanol, kelp energy avoids "food vs fuel" issues and does not require irrigation. Seaweed may prove a viable future biofuel especially if harvested in summer. Read more here.

European Airline Emissions Europe and U.S. airlines clash in court over emissions
U.S. airlines stepped up their campaign against European Union climate policy on Tuesday, challenging the EU in its highest court over the right to regulate their greenhouse gas emissions.

The EU aims to lead the world in fighting climate change, and says it needs to put a price on carbon dioxide emissions to guard against future climate impacts such as crop failures, droughts or flooding. Read more here.

New green farming vital to end global hunger: U.N.
A solid shift to green technologies in world farming is vital if endemic food crises are to be overcome and production boosted to support the global population, the United Nations said on Tuesday.

And as a first step, governments and international agencies should focus on boosting small-scale agriculture in developing countries with support services like rural roads and sustainable irrigation, a report from the world body argued. Read more here.

What Is the Worth of a Degree in Sustainability?
If economics has been hampered by the label, "the dismal science," then sustainability may be in the process of being pegged as "the problem science." From climate change to global inequity, sustainability is often described as a cacophony of seemingly disparate and globally grand challenges to which the expectation of a tantalizingly simple solution is then attached, i.e., "Please do today, so that we can still do tomorrow." With this rather heroic framing, what does an academic degree in sustainability mean? What is its role and value-proposition for those students who are - possibly quite naively - the brave pioneers in this emerging field? Read more here.

National
Detroit Transformed Planting Seeds of Hope: How Sustainable Activism Transformed Detroit
After the death throes of urban decay, what the Motor City can teach us about vision, community, and the power of movements.
In 1988, we in Detroit were at one of the great turning points in history. Detroit's deindustrialization, devastation, and depopulation had turned the city into a wasteland, but it had also created the space and place where there was not only the necessity but also the possibility of creating a city based not on expanding production but on new values of sustainability and community. Instead of investing our hopes in GM, Ford, and Chrysler and becoming increasingly alienated from each other and the Earth, we needed to invest in, work with, and rely on each other. Read more here.

River Oil Spill Exxon oil spill on Yellowstone River disrupts farms
HELENA, Montana - Gov. Brian Schweitzer vowed on Tuesday to cling to Exxon Mobil like "the smell on a skunk" for as long as it takes to get the company to clean up a weekend oil spill that fouled an otherwise pristine stretch of the Yellowstone River in Montana.

A 12-inch Exxon pipeline ruptured on Friday night about 150 miles downstream from Yellowstone National Park near the town of Laurel, Mont., southwest of Billings, dumping up to 1,000 barrels, or 42,000 gallons, of crude oil into the flood-swollen river. Read more here.

Google Says Energy Innovation Will Pay Off -- but When?
The folks at Google, not surprisingly, have enormous faith in the power of technology. So a group of them set out to see what technology breakthroughs in clean energy will mean to the economy, the environment and the typical American household. They found good and bad news. Read more here.

American Dream Sign The American Dream vs. the Gospel of Wealth
Is America meant to be a land of opportunity or inequality? Civic virtue or consumerism? Gus Speth explores three deep contradictions in the American identity, asking: What's next for the American dream?
Throughout our history, there have been alternative, competing visions of the "good life" in America. The story of how these competing visions played out in our history is prologue to an important question: What is the American Dream and what is its future? Read more here.

Insiders Sound an Alarm Amid a Natural Gas Rush
Natural gas companies have been placing enormous bets on the wells they are drilling, saying they will deliver big profits and provide a vast new source of energy for the United States.

But the gas may not be as easy and cheap to extract from shale formations deep underground as the companies are saying, according to hundreds of industry e-mails and internal documents and an analysis of data from thousands of wells. Read more here.

EPA Chief E.P.A. Chief Stands Firm as Tough Rules Loom
WASHINGTON - In the next weeks and months, Lisa P. Jackson, the Environmental Protection Agency administrator, is scheduled to establish regulations on smog, mercury, carbon dioxide, mining waste and vehicle emissions that will affect every corner of the economy.

She is working under intense pressure from opponents in Congress, from powerful industries, from impatient environmentalists and from the Supreme Court, which just affirmed the agency's duty to address global warming emissions, a project that carries profound economic implications. Read more here.

Sustainable Business Trust The Role of Trust in Sustainable Business
What is the role of trust in creating sustainable business? Trust Across America posed this question to several experts to assist us in our own research on trustworthy business practices.

Why is the creation of measurable standards of trust important? According to Frank Sonnenberg, author of Managing With a Conscience, 'In the twentieth century, a company measured success by the number of tangible assets (such as property, plant, and equipment) it posted on its balance sheet. In the Information Age, however, intangible assets rule the day. Intangible assets such as trust, creativity, speed, relationships, reputation, loyalty, employee commitment, brand identity, and the ability to adapt to change determine success.' Read more here.

Resilient Congregations Building a Resilient Congregation
Religious congregations are embracing a new role: economic support groups.
As the economic crisis stretches on, religious congregations are playing a vital role in helping people cope. For many, Resilience Circles (also called Common Security Clubs) are a way to help members confront and address their economic insecurities.

Recently, a group of Resilience Circle leaders has been discussing the idea of a "theology for community resilience." How do the resources of our faith traditions support and empower our communities during this time of economic and ecological challenge? How can we help church members overcome their fears of deep and systemic change? Does a theological message-especially in our increasingly pluralistic and multicultural society-add something unique to the work of creating a new economy? Read more here.

U.S. Forest Insects U.S. Forests Threatened By Insects, Report Finds
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. -- Marauding insects have become a leading threat to the nation's forests over the past decade, a problem made worse by drought and a warming climate, a federal report says.

Bark beetles, engraver beetles and gypsy moths are the primary culprits behind a threefold increase in forestland mortality caused by insect attacks between 2003 and 2007, according to a U.S. Forest Service report obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press. The volume of forests in the lower 48 states killed by bugs totaled 37 million acres during the period, up from 12 million during the previous five years. Millions of additional acres have perished since. Read more here.

Discourse
SRTA Bus OUR VIEW: Time for a new SRTA
After years of neglect, the Southeastern Regional Transit Authority has broken down. Now that the diagnostics are complete and reveal the need for major repairs, it may be time to trade it in the old SRTA for a new model.

SRTA is by no means alone in its failure as a public transit agency, but its problems are more severe than many other public transit agencies. Many of SRTA's recent problems have been blamed on the alleged indifference and incompetence of its former administrator, Joseph Cosentino, who was removed from the post in September. Back in May, a scathing report from Clinton Bench, the state's deputy executive director in the office of transportation and planning, painted "a transit authority in serious crisis." Read more here.


Local
Bat decline gets in-depth endangered species review
Researchers at Boston University and elsewhere in the last five years have sounded the alarm over the rapid disappearance of bats from New England and the nation's night sky. Now, the federal government may step in to better protect the winged mammals by possibly listing them on the endangered species list.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials say they are concerned enough about the fate of the eastern small-footed and the northern long-eared bats that they will conduct an in-depth status review to determine if they should be listed. The agency is also doing a preliminary review of the more common little brown bat and four other bat species to determine if they also need protection in part because of the fungus, known as white nose syndrome. Read more here.

R.I. Supreme Court upholds power-purchase pact for wind farm off Block Island
PROVIDENCE - The Rhode Island Supreme Court has upheld a power-purchase agreement between National Grid and Deepwater Wind in a ruling that boosts the chances for development of what could be the first offshore wind farm in the United States.

In a unanimous decision released Friday, the state's highest court found insufficient grounds to overturn the contract under which Rhode Island's dominant utility will buy power from the five-turbine wind farm that Providence-based Deepwater proposes building in waters three miles southeast of Block Island. Read more here.

Local Fish Locally caught catches on
PROVIDENCE - When chef Derek Wagner buys local fish, he knows where it was caught and who landed it.

Wagner, who owns Nicks on Broadway, prizes his close relationship with several Point Judith fishermen for two reasons. He buys fresh seafood from fishermen he trusts. And he can tell his customers where their meals were caught - sometimes how many miles offshore. Read more here.

National Grid agrees to buy power from biogas facility planned for R.I. Central Landfill
A developer is on the verge of tapping into a new source of renewable energy in Rhode Island with a plan to build a facility at the Central Landfill that would generate electricity using gas from decomposing food.

National Grid has agreed to buy power from Orbit Energy's biogas facility for 9.5 cents per kilowatt-hour in 2013, the first year of operation. The price would increase 2 percent annually. The 15-year agreement was filed with the Public Utilities Commission late Wednesday and is awaiting approval. Read more here.

Unemployment Benefits State's economic improvement hurts unemployed in SouthCoast
Stephen Silva said it felt like a rug was pulled out from under him.

Silva, 55, expected his unemployment benefits to expire next month. Unable to find work, he planned to sell his old vinyl albums when he no longer received $358 a week in assistance, half of which he paid to rent space in a local rooming house.

However, almost two weeks ago, the Massachusetts Department of Unemployment Assistance called and said he no longer qualified for assistance because the state's economy has been steadily recovering from the Great Recession. Read more here.

Scallop company expands horizons
NEW BEDFORD - The nation's largest scallop company, Eastern Fisheries, is expanding in China with a scallop farming initiative to keep pace with the growing worldwide market.

Roy Enoksen, co-founder of Eastern Fisheries, told The Standard-Times that while farm-raised scallops are already being produced in large numbers, Eastern wanted to raise its own for a basic reason: "Our whole plan has always been to take it from ocean to the plate," Enoksen said Read more here.

Train Amid rising need and usage, Massachusetts' T could use a tune-up
On a chilly evening last February, a commuter train bound for Worcester, Mass., broke down outside Boston, transforming passengers' usual 80-minute commute into a four-hour nightmare.

The train's failure was among the winter lowlights for the Boston-area commuter rail system's fleet of 80 aging locomotives which, among other woes, have had trouble starting, keeping auxiliary power functioning for lighting systems and maintaining enough air pressure for braking systems, according to transit officials. Read more here.

Rail gets state environmental lift
The state's top environmental official endorsed the Stoughton route as the preferred way to extend commuter rail to New Bedford and Fall River, providing the $1.4 billion project with a regulatory boost.

In a certificate issued Wednesday, Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs Richard K. Sullivan Jr. stated South Coast Rail's draft environmental impact report complies with the state Environmental Policy Act. However, he added there are outstanding issues that need to be resolved, including the development of mitigation plans, before the review can be completed. Read more here.

New Bedford fishermen deserve fitting monument (Jack Spillane Column)
It's such a great idea that it's hard to understand why it hasn't taken off more quickly.

I'm talking about New Bedford building an inspiring monument to its fishermen at the tip of the Fort Rodman peninsula.

The peninsula point is the city land's end, the last part of New Bedford this city's iconic fishermen see when they go down to the sea in the ships. And it's also the first bit of the city they see again when they return to shore from their rugged North Atlantic labors. Read more here.

Fairhaven salt marsh improvements may help reduce mosquitoes
FAIRHAVEN - A nearly $400,000 project to increase tidal flow in the West Island Salt Marsh has been completed with the installation of a 3-foot by 5-foot culvert beneath Fir Street. The culvert replaced a much smaller 15-inch pipe there.

Improvements will increase fresh water drainage, stop the spread of invasive plant species, and provide a better habitat for fish and wildlife, say those behind the project. Read more here.

Lang looks to federal legal probe after losing NOAA suit
NEW BEDFORD - Rather than appeal a federal judge's rejection of the legal challenge against fishery catch shares and sector management by New Bedford and Gloucester, Mayor Scott Lang suggests there might be a better weapon for the city: the Commerce Department's own inspector general, Todd Zinser.

After Zinser debunked years of denial about the problems in the Northeast law enforcement office of NOAA and exposed wrongdoing, mismanagement and missing funds, Lang appealed to him to look into the agency's rule-making process. Lang wanted to know what has been happening behind the scenes, who is involved and what they are doing, and how sector management and catch shares were arrived at. Read more here.

Fairhaven salt marsh improvements may help reduce mosquitoes
FAIRHAVEN - A nearly $400,000 project to increase tidal flow in the West Island Salt Marsh has been completed with the installation of a 3-foot by 5-foot culvert beneath Fir Street. The culvert replaced a much smaller 15-inch pipe there.

Improvements will increase fresh water drainage, stop the spread of invasive plant species, and provide a better habitat for fish and wildlife, say those behind the project. Read more here.

Freetown, solar panel contractor part ways; town starts looking for another
The town and a Portsmouth, R.I.-based energy group could not come to an agreement for the company to install solar panels at a capped landfill. The move would have generated millions of dollars in proposed revenue for the town.

Town Meeting last month approved the negotiations, but Selectwoman Jean Fox confirmed this week that the two sides could not reach an agreement. She did not elaborate any further other than to say that the two sides "couldn't arrive at a meeting of the minds." Read more here.

Our View: Successes build for bay, watershed restoration
Buzzards Bay, fed by the Acushnet River and its tributaries in Plymouth and Bristol counties, is an unquestionable resource of unique and varied beauty. From the mainland, we see oceanscapes framed by the Elizabeth Islands; both sandy and stony coasts with high surf and wading beaches; saltmarshes, inlets and coves filled with an assortment of wildlife to rival the rainforest; and waterways that support craft ranging from inner tubes to oil tankers. Read more here.

Leaf Bullet This Week in Sustainability

Blue Crabs, Minnows, Shrimp, and more! A Seine Net Demonstration

July 8, , 10 - 11:30am, Goosewing Beach Preserve, South Shore, Rd, Little Compton, RI
Free! Join us for an informal lesson on the history and use of the seine net. See what critters we can collect and discover the biodiversity of Goosewing Beach Preserve. Meet in front of the Benjamin Family Environmental Center. All ages welcome. Please register by email at kpisano@tnc.org, or by phone 401-331-7110 x. 33 Details here.

Meat Rabbit Workshop

July 7, 9am to 11 am, Nuestras Raíces Farm, 24 Jones Ferry Rd, Holyoke, MA
Presenter Dr. John Perdrizet, Veterinarian. In this workshop participants will learn the basics of care for meat rabbits. Workshop fees : $20/member and $26 for non-members. No one turned away for lack of funds. Details here.

Lloyd Center Clambake XXVI

July 8, 6:00 p.m., Lloyd Center Headquarters
Cost: Personal "patron" and corporate "sponsorship" levels vary General Admission: $150 per ticket Top-shelf Open Bar Dinner Extraordinaire Silent Auction ... Bid!...Bid!...Bid! Dancing to the music of Men in Black ... For reservations, call the 508-990-0505 x 10. Details here.

Creature Feature

July 8, , 10:30 - 11:00am, Audubon Environmental Education Center, 1401 Hope Street, Bristol, RI
Don't miss the chance to get up-close with Audubon's live resident animals. Learn about these amazing creatures and discover how they survive. A different animal and theme will be featured each day. Program is free with admission but registration is required. July 8: Birds - Meet an Owl July 22: Predators - Meet a Snake August 12: Reptiles - Meet a turtle August 26: Marine animals - Meet a Starfish and Other Tidepool Friends. To register call (401) 949-5454 ext. 3041. Details here.

Summer Beach Ramble

July 9, , 10:00 - 12:00pm, Allens Pond Wildlife Sanctuary parking lot, 1280 Horseneck Road, Westport MA.
Free! Start the season off with a Beach Ramble. Learn what you are stepping on, or walking by when you visit our beaches. A two hour guided "ramble". To register or for more information, contact (508) 636-2437 or gpurtell@massaudubon.org. Details here.

Nutrient Dense Crop Production Course

July 9, , 9:30am - 4:30pm, Amherst, MA.
Courses are taking place in eight locations around the Northeast, three of which will be in Massachusetts. Each course contains five one-day sessions from 9:30am to 4:30pm. Here is the calendar for the 3 courses in Massachusetts that NOFA/Mass is organizing in partnership with Real Food Campaign: Saturdays July 9, and September 10. Morning sessions held at Immanuel Lutheran Church on 867 North Pleasant Street in Amherst, MA. Afternoon sessions held at Simple Gifts Farm, one half mile north on 1089 North Pleasant Street in North Amherst, MA. Details here.

R.I. Great Outdoors Pursuit

July 9, , 11:00am - 3:00pm, Pulaski Memorial Recreation Area, 151 Pulaski Road, Chepacatt, RI
Teams will demonstrate their forest survival skills by competing in an obstacle course, learn how to geo-cache using a GPS, explore beaver dams around Peck Pond, and hike through the Park's numerous hiking trails. Participants can also learn about aquatic invasive species, Rhode Island 's geology, and waste composting through interactive educational displays. Smokey Bear and MaxMan, the Recycling Super Hero will also make appearances. Garelick Farms will provide free beverages, and chefs from Kids First RI will lead a healthy cooking demonstration with samples available for tasting. Participants can also enjoy other park amenities including free parking, restroom, and changing facilities, along with fishing, swimming, and picnicking areas. Click here for the day's full schedule. Info: For more information, please contact Robert Paquette at (401) 222-2632 or via email to robert.paquette@dem.ri.gov or Terri Bisson at (401) 222-2776, ext. 4402 or by email to terri.bisson@dem.ri.gov. Details here.

Museum Institute for Teaching Science Workshop

July 11-15,9am to 3pm, Locations: Lloyd Center (Dartmouth), Whaling Museum (New Bedford), Buttonwood Park Zoo (New Bedford), Stony Brook Wildlife Sanctuary (Norfolk).
Inquiry-Based Science: Investigating Water & Energy Concepts in the State Frameworks - for kindergarten through 8th grade teachers Discover the natural history of the estuary and a diversity of freshwater resources. Investigate the various species that live here, how they are adapted to survive in a marine or aquatic environment and how we are connected to these invaluable resources. Then utilize these significant natural resources to create an inquiry-based program that will highlight the many forms of water and energy that cycle through the region. Registration cost (Tuition Fee waived in Southeast Region): One educator: $250. Two educators from the same school or school district: $225 each. Three or more educators from the same school or school district: $200 each. PDP's provided and graduate credit is available for an additional fee. To learn more about this program or to pre-register, visit the MITS website at www.mits.org or call 617-328-1515. Details here.

Goosewing Explorers Program

July 12,10am to 12pm, Goosewing Beach Preserve, Benjamin Family Environmental Center, South Shore Rd, Little Compton, RI
This interactive program will investigate Piping Plovers, biodiversity, and the habitats and ecology of the Preserve, all using real scientific tools and methods! Attend all four programs and become an honorary Goosewing Beach Field Scientist! Programs meet at the Benjamin Family Environmental Center and run promptly from 10am-noon. These programs are for children age 7 and up. Adults must accompany explorers under 10 years old. Program is free but there is a parking fee for the town beach. Please pre-register by email or phone, kpisano@tnc.org or 401-331-7110 x. 33 Details here.

Summer Fun Vacation Program "Farm Adventures"

July 12-15,10am to 12pm, Middleboro, MA
Soule Homestead in Middleboro is ready to welcome children to their Summer Fun Vacation Program. Seven weeks of "Farm Adventures" begins July 12th and will meet every Tuesday through Friday until August 26th. A full calendar of fun farm activities for children ages 5 to 15 is planned - along with crafts, games, outside adventures and a quiet lunch time story. Each day the theme changes to keep children physically active and mentally engaged. The organic farm is a dynamic environment with something new happening every day! Children ages 5-10 will meet from 9:30 a.m. to 12 noon and children ages 11-15 will meet from 12:30 to 3 p.m. Sign up your child for a day or multiple days. You do not have to be a member to participate. Per day price: $13 member, $15 non-member / 4 day week price: $45 member, $53 non-member. Pre-registratio?n is required. Children who participate for the entire summer will receive a Junior Farmer Certificate. We reserve the right to cancel the program due to lack of enrollment. See our website www.soulehomest?ead.org for program themes and dates or request a Summer Fun Flyer by calling Laurie at 508-947-6744 or email SouleEducator1@?verizon.net Details here.

Chocolate and Tweets

July 14, 7 - 8:30 pm, Audubon Environmental Education Center, 1401 Hope Street, Bristol, RI
Join the Audubon for a chocolate adventure! Presented by Jennifer Schouppe, executive pastry chef at Johnson and Wales University, this program will explain the unique history of chocolate and how it is made. Jennifer will demonstrate basic truffle filling and finishing, followed by the best part -- sampling and enjoying! The program is limited is 25 adults, so please register early. $15 member. $20 non-member. To register, call (401) 949-5454 ext. 3041. Details here.

Barn Raising: Marketing Your Farm Business -> Increasing Your Sales

July 12-August 20, UMass Extension Cranberry Station, East Wareham
A Five Session Workshop Series Including a Create-Your-Own Website Lab (optional). Join us for a modern take on a classic barn raising where you will come together with other growers and producers in your farming community to establish a marketing plan and website for your farm business. Just as the barn is vital to the operations of your farm, a marketing plan is vital to the success of your farm as a business. In short, improve your marketing plan and you'll improve your sales. Who Should Attend?: Anyone interested in establishing a marketing plan or updating an existing strategy that needs some fine-tuning. How Much Does It Cost?: 4 Sessions + website lab: $200.00; SEMAP member 4 Sessions + website lab: $180.00; 4 Sessions (no website lab): $125.00; SEMAP member 4 Sessions (no website lab): $112.00 Get details and register here.

New England Grain Conference: Bread, Beer and Biodiversity

July 14-15, UMass Farm and Colrain Seed Farm, MA
Join us at a regional event on growing organic landrace grains, share skills to reinvigorate heritage grain traditions, exchange seeds, learn how to bake artisan bread in a wood-fired oven, brew artisan beer, and celebrate the harvest. Details here.


Leaf Bullet Save The Date

Operation Clean Sweep - Volunteer!

July 16, 8:30 a.m - noon, St. Luke's Parking Lot at Hawthorn and Page Street, New Bedford
Join Operation Clean Sweep, NEED and Southcoast Hospitals Group to keep New Bedford clean! Community service groups, clubs, businesses and individuals are encouraged to participate in this community event. All volunteers will receive a coupon for a free cup of St. Luke's award winning chowder. Also, this is a great way to earn your community service hours. Tools and gloves are provided. To learn more, visit www.operationcleansweep.net and pre-register or call (508) 979-1493. Also, find us on facebook. Details here.

Introduction to Stand-Up Paddling

July 16, 9-11am, Lloyd Center, South Dartmouth
Stand Up Paddle Boarding is a fun way to explore the waterways, improve your balance and get a fantastic core workout. Anyone can Stand-Up Paddle! Instructors specialize in teaching people with no surfing or paddling experience at all. The only prerequisite is that you are comfortable in the water, and want to try something new! The two hour introduction session will take place in the calm waters of the Slocum River. Participants will be introduced to all the basics; getting familiar with equipment, water entry and balance, proper stance and positioning on the board, efficient paddling technique, safety and etiquette. Come out and give it a try ... you'll love it! Cost: Members: $50, Non-members: $60. Pre-registration required by noon on Friday, July 15th. Ages 14 and up. Limit: 10 Register online or call the Center's event phone at 508-558-2918. Details here.

Capturing the Herbal Harvest

July 16, 10:00AM - 12:00PM, Blithewold, Bristol, RI
Capture the herbal harvest while gardens and farm stands are brimming with fresh herbs. Even though no one wants to think about winter now, you will be thrilled when your pantry and freezer are stocked for winter cooking and holiday gift giving! Imagine lining your cupboard shelves with jewel toned bottles of herb vinegars, golden brown herb mustards and sparkling jars of herbal jellies. Picture containers of herbed butters, bags of rosemary walnuts and bottles of herb pesto filling a corner of your freezer. Details here.

Backyard Bats

July 16, 10:30AM - 11:30AM, Audubon Environmental Education Center, 1401 Hope Street, Bristol, RI
Bats are a natural way to cut back on unwanted mosquitoes and flying/biting pests in your yard. Would you like to know how to attract bats to your backyard? Or do you have bats living in your attic and want them out? Join Audubon and get the answers to your questions about these amazing winged creatures. You'll discover the ins and outs of New England bat behavior and learn about bat house design and placement. After the program visit the Audubon Nature Gift Shop for bat houses, books and even some bat guano(an excellent natural fertilizer) to help your garden grow! There is no fee for this program but registration is required. Call (401) 949-5454 ext. 3041. Details here.

Saturday Supper - Agriculture and Seaweed

July 16, 4-7pm Kettle Pond Farm, Berkley MA
During a potlluck supper, learn about local seaweeds found in the Taunton River and the region. You will see them up close, taste them, and hear about their uses in agriculture at Kettle Pond Farm. For information call 508-822-6919. Details here.

Dragonflies Walk

July 17, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Allens Pond Wildlife Sanctuary, 1280 Horseneck Rd., Westport, MA
Observe dragonflies and damselflies up close and learn techniques for identifying these magnificent creatures! Fee: Adults $4.00 member/$6.00 non-member, Children $4.00 member /$6.00 non-member. For registration and more information, contact (508) 636-2437 or gpurtell@massaudubon.org. Details here.

Museum Institute for Teaching Science Workshop

July 18-22,9am to 3pm, Locations: Lloyd Center (Dartmouth), Whaling Museum (New Bedford), Buttonwood Park Zoo (New Bedford), Stony Brook Wildlife Sanctuary (Norfolk).
Inquiry-Based Science: Investigating Water & Energy Concepts in the State Frameworks - for kindergarten through 8th grade teachers Discover the natural history of the estuary and a diversity of freshwater resources. Investigate the various species that live here, how they are adapted to survive in a marine or aquatic environment and how we are connected to these invaluable resources. Then utilize these significant natural resources to create an inquiry-based program that will highlight the many forms of water and energy that cycle through the region. Registration cost (Tuition Fee waived in Southeast Region): One educator: $250. Two educators from the same school or school district: $225 each. Three or more educators from the same school or school district: $200 each. PDP's provided and graduate credit is available for an additional fee. To learn more about this program or to pre-register, visit the MITS website at www.mits.org or call 617-328-1515. Details here.

Roots Down - Free Organic Gardening Workshop

July 19, 5:00pm, Brix Bounty Farm
Summertime Farm Tour at Brix Bounty Farm plus Melons! Details here.

Vegetable Canning Class

July 20, 1:00pm to 3pm, Cedar Spring Herb Farm, Harwich, MA
Local grower/herbalist Donna Eaton will show us the ins and outs of canning our own delicious, all-natural Vegetables. We will focus on what's available that week, picked fresh from local growers. Learn recipes, canning instructions, and tidbits on saving money by preserving locally grown foods. Take home a jar! Details and register here.

Webinar: Investment Grade Audit

July 21, 1:30pm to 3:30pm, Online
This webcast describes the Investment Grade Audit (IGA) process, including the sequence of steps in an IGA, what to expect from ESCOs, and other project details. The presenter, Irina Bulkley-Hopkins, will outline and explain the details and differences in the definition of the IGA as compared to other energy audits commonly used in the field. This includes emphasis on the goals of what an IGA must accomplish, along with the questions that the facility owner must ask and the information that must be gathered before the IGA is conducted by an ESCO. Topics covered will include sources of information and data that need to investigated before and during the IGA; components of and expectations from a high quality IGA (baseline, typical ECMS and how to select them, calculations of energy savings, etc.); what should be included in the IGA, and how to prevent potential shortcomings to watch for. Presenters will provide a sample list of issues that are traditionally not covered by an IGA and suggest the measures that help mitigate those issues. Details and register here.

Wild Night at the Zoo

July 23, 6:00pm to 10pm, Buttonwood Park Zoo
Pre-sale tickets are available for $100 per person or $125 per person at the door. You "otter" join us for the Buttonwood Park Zoological Society's annual gala and benefit auction! Wild Night at the Zoo features the best food, music, drink and silent auction of the season. Pre-sale tickets are available for $100 per person or $125 per person at the door. Proceeds of the gala support educational and conservation programs at the Zoo. Don't miss a photo with our Asian elephants, Emily & Ruth! Details and ticket sales here.

Hockomock Area YMCA Hosts 5th Annual Triathlon

July 24, Registration 6:00am, Race 8am, Luciano's at Lake Pearl in Wrentham, MA
Swim, bike and ride: 500-meter swim in Lake Pearl, a 9-mile bike ride, and a 3.1-mile run. The Triathlon is designed to work for beginners as well as advanced tri-athletes. People ages 14 or older are eligible with awards presented to the top 3 male and female finishers in each category. Participants can expect a high-quality race at an affordable price. The registration fee is $75 and there is also an additional $10 fee if participant is not a USAT member. This year, the Y will be hosting a pre-event Pasta Dinner on Saturday, July 23rd at 6:00pm, which will include number pick-up and raffle prizes including a TRX strap and gift baskets. The fee is $15 and requires pre-registration. The location of the pasta dinner will be at the Invensys Foxboro Branch YMCA at 67 Mechanic Street, Foxboro. For more information and to register, please visit www.imathlete.com, or visit any branch of the Hockomock Area YMCA. All proceeds from the Triathlon will benefit the Hockomock Area YMCA's annual Reach Out for Youth and Families Campaign, which offers financial assistance to welcome and support children and families in our community to come to the YMCA. Details and ticket sales here.

Sustainability Summer Camp 2011 - Remaking Our World: Greening the planet and our lives

July 25-July 29 WHO: Students entering grades 6, 7 or 8, dedicated to creating a more sustainable world.
WHAT: Campers will be engaged in hands-on projects using artistic media and film technologies to document and promote their environmental learning from the week. Activities throughout the week will include environmental crafts, building, utilizing energy technologies, and scientific research in the campus forest. Field trips and swimming are also part of the week.
WHY: The goal of camp is to develop creative sustainability leaders equipped to respond to the environmental challenges of the 21st century. Topics covered include Renewable Energy Technologies, Environmental Science, Environmental Math, and Nutrition. Get details and register here.

Webinar: Furthering Your Local Governments' Energy Efficiency Goals: Part 1 - Getting Support From Local Leaders

July 26 2-3:30pm, Online
This webcast will focus on useful and cost-effective startegies to engage local leaders in energy efficiency efforts. These strategies include developing a productive approach to addressing a county board or city council; demonstrating the impact of projects for job creation; measuring project cost savings and positiive cash flow; highlighting green government benefits; and focusing on overall economic recovery and opoerational improvement. The webcast will provide examples of grantees that have successfully engaged local leaders and information on accessing additional support through nationwide stakeholder groups. Get details and register here.

Careers in Weatherization Presentation

July 28 Time and location TBA
This workshop will review typical weatherization job positions and opportunities, with a focus on the skills and certifications required in low- income and utility-funded weatherization projects. Details here.

37th Annual Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) Summer Conference

August 12th - 14th Amherst, MA
This year we'll be presenting two workshops at the Summer Conference: (1) a beginner workshop "Interpreting Soil Tests" - Accurately gauging nutrient needs in our soils is a critical step in making sound fertility decisions. We will set out to demystify soil test results, from cation exchange capacity (CEC) and base saturation to ppm and lbs/acre. Hands on activity included to help participants gain confidence in interpreting soil test results. (2) an advaced workshop "The Case for Full Spectrum Fertility" - An examination of our pre-transplant fertility protocol. Join us as we discuss the steps taken at Brix Bounty Farm in the critical week leading up to transplanting. Focusing on soil fertility we aim to create prime soil conditions for vigorous root growth and thriving transplants. Inoculants, amendments, and energy in depth. Details here.


Leaf Bullet Announcements
UMass Dartmouth to Offer BPI Certification Courses in August
Upon completion of this 7 week program and successful completion of exams students will be certified in BPI standards. BPI (Building Performance Institute) is a national standards development and credentialing organization for residential energy efficiency retrofit work. Students completing the program and exams will be:
  • Level 1: BPI Residential Building Envelope Whole House Air Leakage Control Installer
  • Level 2: BPI Building Envelope Professional Certification
  • Level 3: BPI Building Analyst Certified

Course Dates: August 10th-September 20th
Get details here.

Sustainable "Center Cafe" Opens in South End "ecoNewBedford" District
The Center Café is the last piece of the demonstration project on Brock Avenue called ecoNewBedford. It serves coffee and ice cream, salads, home-made soups, and lite sandwiches. Breakfast sandwiches, fruit-yogurt smoothies, and waffles are served any time. The café open early morning and into the evening. A 400 square foot private meeting room can be reserved by local organizations or for use as a flexible workplace. Offsite catering is available. Occasional presentations on topics ranging from Setting New Directions, Empowering Creativity, and Active Lifestyles are planned. Artists are hanging their work for sale in the Café, and a selection of gifts is also available.

The Center Café is the last piece of the demonstration project on Brock Avenue called ecoNewBedford. It serves coffee and ice cream, salads, home-made soups, and lite sandwiches. Breakfast sandwiches, fruit-yogurt smoothies, and waffles are served any time. The café open early morning and into the evening. A 400 square foot private meeting room can be reserved by local organizations or for use as a flexible workplace. Offsite catering is available. Occasional presentations on topics ranging from Setting New Directions, Empowering Creativity, and Active Lifestyles are planned. Artists are hanging their work for sale in the Café, and a selection of gifts is also available. Get details here.
Organic Agriculture I course open for September
Bristol Community College (BCC) announces the opening of registration for the Organic Farming Practices I (OFP 114). This is the first of a two-semester course sequence and is designed for farmers, gardeners, landscapers, land managers, community development organizations, consumers, and public policy decision makers seeking practical alternatives for long-term sustainable food production and land use. This course will include the rationale and outlook for sustainable agriculture, soil fertility and management, tillage options, cover crops, crop rotation plans, composting, and organic crop production. BCC is an open enrollment college. Senior citizens and veterans may be eligible for waiver of tuition for credit courses. The course will begin on September 12 and meet Tuesdays and Thursdays at 2:00 pm until December 16. Information and registration is available online at http://www.bristolcc.edu Questions? email Dr. Jim Corven at james.corven@bristolcc.edu Get details here.
Westport River EcoTours
Eco-tours of the Westport River are available on Thursdays and Fridays until Labor Day Weekend. There will be a tour at 10 AM to noon and another from 1PM to 3PM on Thursdays and Fridays. There is a limit of four people per tour, and children under the age of 13 must wear a life preserver at all times. It is $100 per tour for WRWA members, and $140 non-members. Please call our office at (508)636-3016 to book a tour. If you are paying with a credit card please give us your information when you reserve your tour - your card will not be charged until after the tour. The boat leaves from Dock D-Slip 1 from F.L. Tripps on Cherry & Webb Lane, so please meet us there at least ten minutes before departure time. Get details here.
Museum Institute for Teaching Science (MITS) Workshop
Inquiry-Based Science: Investigating Water & Energy Concepts in the State Frameworks - for kindergarten through 8th grade teachers
Monday - Thursday, July 11th - July 15th 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Monday - Friday, July 18th - July 22nd 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Locations: Lloyd Center (Dartmouth), Whaling Museum (New Bedford), Buttonwood Park Zoo (New Bedford), Stony Brook Wildlife Sanctuary (Norfolk). Registration cost (Tuition Fee waived in Southeast Region): One educator: $250. Two educators from the same school or school district: $225 each. Three or more educators from the same school or school district: $200 each. PDP's provided and graduate credit is available for an additional fee. Discover the natural history of the estuary and a diversity of freshwater resources. Investigate the various species that live here, how they are adapted to survive in a marine or aquatic environment and how we are connected to these invaluable resources. Then utilize these significant natural resources to create an inquiry-based program that will highlight the many forms of water and energy that cycle through the region. Get details here.
Zoo Crew Summer Program for Children
Zoo Members: $175 per week for one child. (Siblings are $150 each) Non-Members: $200 per week for one child. (Siblings are $175 each) Zoo Crew is a summer program for children ages 8-12. Each session has a balance of outdoor and classroom learning opportunities, educational games and activities, crafts, and fun! Each week-long program runs 9:00AM-3:00PM, Monday thru Friday. For more information or to register, please call the Zoo's education department at (508) 991-6178 x 31. Session One: July 25-July 29 Session Two: August 1- August 5 Sessions Three: August 8-August 12 Get details here.
Department of Energy Webcasts
This interactive page will help you quickly find live webcasts that fit your schedule, or on-demand webcasts and pre-recorded training presentations to view at your convenience. You can choose your time zone as well and filter the list by week, month, webinar series, eligible activity or topic, or presenter. The DOE offers free online training to help you improve the energy performance of your organization. No travel, no lost time out of the office, and no cost - The DOE makes it easy to get the information you need, today. Join your colleagues to better understand how the DOE can help you lower operating costs, improve your energy management program, and expand your professional development. Get details here.
Organic Pest & Disease Control Course
Bristol Community College announces a new course in Organic Pest & Disease Control. The course is designed to benefit farmers, gardeners, nursery growers, landscapers, land managers, and community organizations. The course will be a practical survey of principles and practices for effective management of pests and diseases in SE Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The course will be available as a 1 credit college accredited course ($166 tuition) or as a noncredit course ($75) through the Center for Workforce and Community Education. Online enrollment is available at www.bristolcc.edu. Senior citizens and veterans may be eligible for waiver of tuition for credit courses. The course will begin on September 12 and meet Mondays (6-9 pm) until October 24. More information: contact Dr. Jim Corven (james.corven@bristolcc.edu).
Ocean Explorium Annual Appeal 2011
The Ocean Explorium has just launched its 2011 Annual Appeal, with a mailing to individual and corporate members, donors, volunteers and community supporters. Contributions to the Annual Appeal support the organization, its staff, exhibits and programs. Mark Smith, Executive Director of the Ocean Explorium, hopes that gifts to this year's Appeal surpass previous campaigns as a new exhibit is being installed at the same time that demand for programs continues to increase. Learn more here.
Volunteering at Sharing the Harvest Community Farm
Get exercise, enjoy the outdoors, and have a positive impact on your life and others. Volunteers help in every stage of farming here at STH - from planting seeds, to transplanting seeds grown into plants; to cultivating those freshly-planted plants to harvesting their produce. During April, volunteers can expect to spend the majority of their time in the greenhouse, seeding; they may also freshen up the raised beds and direct-seed some cooler-weather crops. If you're interested in volunteering, our drop-in hours are: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 9:00AM to 1:00PM - Wednesday afternoons from 2:00PM to 5:00PM. For more information about volunteering, please visit www.ymcasouthcoast.org and search for Sharing the Harvest. You can also contact us by email at sharingtheharvest@ymcasouthcoast.org or via phone at 508 993 3361 extension 13.
New Bedford Wetland Photo Contest
The New Bedford Conservation Commission is proud to announce the first ever New Bedford Wetland Photo Contest! We are looking for your best photograph(s) of any flora, fauna, or natural landscape in New Bedford’s wetlands. The goal of this contest is for everyone to become more aware of wetlands in New Bedford and of their beauty and benefit to the environment. Photographs will be displayed at New Bedford City Hall and the public can vote for their favorite photo(s). The top 12 photographs will have their credited picture in the 2012 Conservation Commission electronic calendar. There is also a drawing to win great prizes just for entering the photo contest. Pictures will be accepted until September 30, voting begins October – November 4th and winners will be announced in December.

For more information and to read official rules, view New Bedford wetland locations and to print an entry form visit  http://www.newbedford-ma.gov/WetlandPhotoContest.htm
Buy Carbon Credits with the Marion Institute
Happy New Year from everyone here at the Marion Institute, where to celebrate 2011 we have just introduced our $7 Carbon Diet which is your chance to offset one ton of carbon emissions for just $7. Your tax-free donation will go directly to our Gaviotas Carbon Offset Initiative, which has been reforesting tropical rainforest for over twenty years. So here's hoping you, and our planet, have a great new year. Donate here.
Sustainability Assessment: Responsibility and Renewal
Our sustainability assessment, "Responsibility and Renewal," the work of dozens of UMD community members, was published a few weeks ago. Packed with information about our current state and our collective dreams, the publication is available online at: http://issuu.com/umdpublications/docs/responsibility_renewal_assessment We also have beautiful printed copies for use in classes and offices--call us for more information. Download it here (PDF).
New Bedford's Ocean Explorium seeks volunteers
The Ocean Explorium is currently in need of adult volunteers for our admissions and gift shop operations. All volunteers for the Ocean Explorium receive training, uniform shirts and other benefits. Volunteers are invited to learn about aquarium operations, behind the scenes as well as in the public eye. Learn more here.
EPA Webcasts and Podcasts: Local Climate and Energy Webcasts
The Local Climate and Energy Webcast Series assists local governments as they explore topics related to local government climate change and clean energy efforts. These monthly webcasts highlight EPA resources available to local governments and present examples of successful climate and energy programs and policies implemented locally. Presentations, recordings, and other supplemental materials are available sorted by topic or sorted by date. Learn more here.
Coalition For Buzzards Bay volunteer opportunities
The Coalition for Buzzards Bay is growing and we are looking for talented, energetic, and passionate staff members and volunteers to help further our mission. Check out the opportunities here.
Essay Contest for Kids and Teens
Like A Drop of Water's writing contest offers young people, ages eight through seventeen, world wide the opportunity to share their ideas on how they and their countries can reduce climate change and pollution. We hope parents, grandparents and teachers will feel free to share their ideas with their young author. Teachers and their students may submit a class essay as well as serve as judges. Learn about the contest here.

Leaf Bullet Weekly Green Tip
Sunscreen - protection or poison?
The regular application of sunscreen might protect us from sunburn, and that's a big might according to some recent studies, but it may also cause all sorts of other health problems - for ourselves and the wider environment. Learn more here.

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